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Bidding begins on $3.3-million road repair project for Hollister

Hollister City Council unanimously approves resolution to move forward with bids to begin repairing downtown roads. SB-1 will fund $1.7 million of $3.3 million cost.
Bryan Swanson said the project was extremely exciting.

By a unanimous vote to approve a resolution, Hollister City Council took the next step to begin what residents have been demanding, the repair of the city’s roads, which will be partially funded by the California Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017, or SB-1. Council member Mickie Luna pulled for discussion the consent agenda item for the resolution to authorize the calling for sealed bids because she said she wanted the public to be aware of what was about to finally be accomplished.

“This is the beginning of affirming the work that is going to be done on the roads in the City of Hollister,” she said to Bryan Swanson, director of the city’s Planning Department, as he stood at the podium. “I wanted you to come forward and say a few words on that so the community realizes that we are starting on the project.”

“This is an extremely exciting project,” Swanson said. “It’s a true reinvestment back into Hollister streets. The estimated total cost of the road rehabilitation is roughly $3.3 million.”

On October 2, 2017, the city council adopted a resolution that incorporated a list of projects that would be partially funded by SB-1, according the city records. The approved projects are included as part of the 2017/2018 Capital Improvement Projects Program and Budget, and are known as CIP C1701, or the Road Rehabilitation 2017/2018 Project. On October 5, 2017, the Planning Department issued an order to prepare the necessary contract drawings and specifications required to construct the pavement overlay project.

Swanson said the plans are now substantially complete for bidding purposes and recommended that the city council approve the resolution, which it did. It’s anticipated that the SB-1 funding will reimburse the city for its portion that will come from the General Fund. While the cost of construction is estimated at $3,327,095, the actual budget costs will be presented to the city council at the time of construction contract award.

Swanson then took a few minutes to tell the council about the various roads around the city that are included in the project:

  • San Felipe Road - South of Bypass (SR 25) to 3rd St. - The maintenance proposed is an overlay that is expected to bring the PCI (a measurement of road conditions) to 100 and provide a useful life of 30 years prior to needing another overlay.
  • San Felipe Road - North of Bypass (SR 25) to City Limits - The maintenance proposed is a 1 foot dig out and patching of failed areas that is expected to bring the PCI to about 85 and provide a useful life of an additional 10 years.
  • South Street - San Benito St. to West Street - The PCI is 22. This street serves the downtown area from the west side of Hollister. The maintenance proposed is an overlay that is expected to bring the PCI to 100 and provide a useful life of 30 years.
  • Monterey St. - South St. to Nash Rd. - The PCI ranges from 30 to 54, with the majority at about 32. This street serves the downtown area near San Benito High School. The maintenance proposed is an overlay that is expected to bring the PCI to 100 and provide a useful life of 30 years.
  • Westside Blvd. - South St. to Nash Rd. - The PCI ranges from 56 to 82 with the majority at about 66. This street serves the west side of Hollister providing a traffic corridor from Fourth St. to Nash Road. The maintenance proposed is an overlay that is expected to bring the PCI to 100 and provide a useful life of 30 years.
  • San Benito St. - Nash Rd. The PCI ranges from 60 to 67, with the majority at 60. This street is adjacent to San Benito High School, is a southern gateway to Hollister, and frequently traveled to tourist attractions in southerly San Benito County. The maintenance proposed is overlay that is expected to bring the PCI to 100 and provide a useful life of 30 years.
  • West St. - Fourth St. to South St. - The PCI ranges from 20 to 24, with the majority at 20. This street serves residential and part of the central business district of Hollister. The maintenance proposed is overlay that is expected to bring the PCI to 100 and provide a useful life of 30 years.
  • Hawkins St. - San Benito St. to Monterey St. - The PCI is 13. This street serves the residential area near downtown. The maintenance proposed is overlay that is expected to bring the PCI to 100 and provide a useful life of 30 years.
  • Flynn Rd. - San Felipe Rd. to SR 25 - This section is within the City of Hollister and County of San Benito County jurisdictions. The PCI in the city limits ranges from 50 to 64, with the majority at about 64. This road serves the North Hollister industrial and airport area. The maintenance proposed is an overlay that is expected to bring the PCI to 100 and provide a useful life of 30 years. The proposal is to combine efforts with the County to repair this road.

Swanson said once the city awards the bid, construction should begin in early summer. Council member Karson Klauer then asked where the $3.3-million figure came from. Swanson said the city had received $1.7 million from the state. He said the consulting engineer incorporated that number and came up with the $3.3 million figure.

“It’s an aggressive project and we’re getting a pretty good bang for our buck,” Swanson said.

Council member Jim Gillio wanted to be clear about how much of the funding was coming from SB-1 and elsewhere. Swanson said the city is contributing approximately $200,000 from the General Fund, with the remainder coming from sales taxes.

“I just wanted to point out that SB-1 is, by far, the largest portion of the funding for these projects,” Gillio said.

Klauer questioned if COG funds were also being used. Swanson confirmed that COG monies were included in the funding.

Previous BenitoLink stories on city and county roads and funding: 

All county roads substandard, no funding improvements in sight

Hollister must spend $3 million more annually to maintain road conditions

State tax wont be enough to maintain county roads

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About:
John Chadwell (John Chadwell)

John Chadwell is freelance photojournalist, copywriter, ghostwriter, scriptwriter and novelist. He is a former U.S. Navy Combat Photojournalist and is an award-winning writer who has worked for magazine, newspapers, radio and television. He has a BA in Journalism and Mass Communications from Chapman University and underwent graduate studies at USC Cinema School. John has worked as a script doctor and his own script, God's Club, was released as a motion picture in 2016. He has also written eight novels, ranging from science fiction to true crime that are sold on Amazon. To contact John Chadwell, send an email to: johnchadwell@benitolink.com.

Comments

Submitted by John Noble on

I don't know anything about road construction, so I am curious about this "30 year life" specification. 

- Who guarantees that performance? 
- If the vendor doesn't fix things years down the road, is there some sort of performance bond?
- What is the criteria for an area to be defective/get fixed?
- Is it literal, "30 years"?  Or a guarantee that they just say, "Yep, that road is 30 years old and depleted alright" and nothing happens?
- How quickly after notice does the repair have to get done?
- To what level of quality does the repair have to be done- good as new or "good as the rest of the 20 year old road is"?

And semi-related; what criteria is given to ANY trenching on our roads, with regard to leaving it "as good or better"?  Are there deviation standards for bumps, dips over X number of feet or something?  4th St has a half dozen new trenches from the apartments going up that have been "fixed" multiple times- but still are not even close to smooth- and they sure won't get better over time all on their own.  You KNOW a GC isn't ever going to come back and fix them months from now, once when they're all packed and gone w/final payment- so why hasn't it been fixed? 

Love to hear the city is already on it!

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